Setup AEON Wallet using Linux

Objective:
– Prepare your Ubuntu from scratch
– Setup AEON Wallet from scratch
– First start of daemon (aeond)
– Sync to the Blockchain for the first time
– Start simplewallet

Requirements:
– Ubuntu 16.04
– 12 GB RAM or enough HDD/SDD space to create a swap
– If you don’t have enough RAM and HDD/SDD space, check out Setup AEON Wallet using Linux (light)

Disclaimer:
– I am not a linux professional, some parts of this guide can be improved and be done in a more professional way.
– If you use the commands as root user, you can skip the “sudo” in each command

 


 

Table of contents:
Step 1: Login and updating your Ubuntu
Step 2: Create a swapfile
Step 3: Install required packages
Step 4: Download and installation of AEON wallet
Step 5: First start of Aeond (daemon)
Step 6: First start of your AEON Wallet

 


 

Step 1: Login and updating your Ubuntu

Login to your Ubuntu.

If you see a message upon login saying:

Then you must update your Ubuntu first. For that we must update the package list of Ubuntu first:

sudo apt-get update

Let your Ubuntu work and wait for it to finish.

When you see the [user]@[yourhostname]:~# line, it means the command has been executed. Always make sure that the last few lines of on the commandline doesnt contain error messages.
A known issue is: E: Unable to lock the administration directory (/var/lib…
If you get that, it could mean you just freshly booted your ubuntu and it was still starting up. Wait for a few more minutes and retry the command for update.

Now we can start the actual update of Ubuntu:

sudo apt-get dist-upgrade

Let your Ubuntu work until it pauses.

y

Confirm with y and press enter to continue the installation of the updates. It will take a while now, wait for it to finish.

Now that the update is done, we need to reboot Ubuntu.

reboot

Once the reboot is done, login again on your Ubuntu.

Now you will see, that there is no pending package to install. Good job!

 

Step 2: Create a swapfile

In case your system has below 12 GB RAM, you have to create a swapfile. A swapfile is kinda like RAM but uses your HDD/SDD storage instead to extend your physical RAM. If you have 12 GB RAM or above, you can skip this step.

We want at least 12 GB RAM/swap all in all to start the wallet and yet still have enough RAM to use our Ubuntu.

In case your system has 8 GB RAM, make at least a 4GB swap.
(If your system has 4 GB RAM make a 8GB swap, i.e. use 8000 on the command below instead of 4000)

sudo dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/myswap.swap bs=1M count=4000

Let your Ubuntu work and wait for it to finish.

Once the swapfile is created, we have to register it as a swap to Ubuntu.

sudo mkswap /mnt/myswap.swap

Now the swapfile needs to be activated.

sudo swapon /mnt/myswap.swap

Our swapfile is successfully added to Ubuntu. To enhance the security we will set the access rights to this file to the system only.

sudo chmod 600 /mnt/myswap.swap

After this command, there will be no feedback by the commandline, so we check if the accessrights are correct.

sudo ls -lh /mnt/myswap.swap

All good now. Now we need to configure the swap to be included upon the next reboot of the system. Else it wont be used by Ubuntu on the next restart.

sudo nano /etc/fstab

Use your arrow keys to navigate to the bottom of the editor.

Now add the following line to the bottom of the editor.

/mnt/myswap.swap none swap sw 0 0

Press CTRL + O to save the changes.

Press Enter. There will be a confirmation saying: [Wrote xx lines]. This means the changes were written down to the file.

Press CTRL + X to exit the editor.

You should be back into the normal view of your commandline.
If you need more swap in future you can repeat those steps to add additional swapfiles to your system.

Congratulation, you just setup your swap for your Ubuntu.

Lets reboot and make sure the swap is correct even after a reboot.

reboot

Once the reboot is done, login again on your Ubuntu.

Check if the swap is activated and running

sudo swapon -s

As you can see the swap is activated and running.

 

Step 3: Install required packages

We need to install now the required packages for AEON.
(AEON Dependencies: GCC 4.7.3 or later, CMake 2.8.6 or later, and Boost 1.53 or later (except
1.54))

sudo apt-get install cmake g++ libboost-all-dev

Let your Ubuntu work until it pauses. Confirm again with y and wait till it finishes. All required packages are now installed.

 

Step 4: Download and installation of AEON wallet

Time to setup our AEON wallet.

sudo git clone https://github.com/aeonix/aeon aeon

This command clones the AEON repository on your Ubuntu into the folder “aeon”. Switch now into that folder.

cd aeon

Start compiling the aeon code.

sudo make

This will take a while. Sit back and relax and wait for it to finish. Progress can be seen by the % given in the commandline.

After it finished, we can navigate to the new files.

cd build/release/src

And see the content of the folder

ls

There you will see the 4 newly generated files:
– aeond
– simplewallet
– simpleminer
– connectivity_tool

For easier access, we copy two files to the main folder “aeon”.

Copy of aeond (if you started this guide in a different folder, please adjust path)
sudo cp /root/aeon/build/release/src/aeond /root/aeon

Copy of simplewallet (if you started this guide in a different folder, please adjust path)
sudo cp /root/aeon/build/release/src/simplewallet /root/aeon

Now we navigate back to the main “aeon” folder.

Either repeat this command till you’re back in “aeon” folder
cd ..
This command jumps one folder up.

or jump directly to the main folder
cd /root/aeon

Check for your copied files
ls

You should see simplewallet and aeond.
aeond – also known as daemon (in layman term the aeon blockchain)
simplewallet – wallet

Another step is done and you are ready to start the blockchain.

 

Step 5: First start of Aeond (daemon)

Please note that this step will take a lot time since it depends on your network connection. It will download around 8 GB to sync with the aeon network.

Start now aeond.

sudo ./aeond

The daemon has now been started.

This means, that the daemon is now syncing with the blockchain.
527 -> 51707 [51180 blocks behind]
You will see how this number increases till it matches the total amount of blocks in the blockchain.
601 -> 839239 [838638 blocks behind]
Above line means that 601 of 839239 blocks have been synced. We need to reach 839239 -> 839239 and 0 days behind.

Ignore this message for now. Sometimes upon first start the daemon will show this message already before it is synced with the blockchain network.

At certain points, we will hit blockchain checkpoints. It shows us how far we are synced with the network.
White messages like “Some problems at write: Connection reset by peer:xxx” can be ignored and are only for information.

Wait till the blockchain is synced. You dont have to do anything yet.

Optional:
In case you need to really shutdown your system temporarily and take a break from syncing.
exit

This will save the blockchain data and shutdown the daemon. That way, your progress wont be lost upon next start of the daemon.

Later, once you want to continue, you can just start your aeond again as previously explained in Step 5: First start of Aeond.

 

Once the blockchain is synced, there will be a special checkpoint like this:

We successfully synced our daemon with the blockchain network. Now we want to save our blockchain. Just type “exit” and press enter.

exit

This will save the blockchain data and shutdown the daemon. That way, your progress wont be lost upon next start of the daemon.
Wait till it finished saving the blockchain and goes back to your usual Ubuntu commandline. This will take some time since it will write down around 4GB to your HDD/SDD.

Optional:

If its stuck like this and wont go back to your usual Ubuntu command line, close the terminal/commandline and open a new one, no problem. Make sure you are already beyond the “Blockchain stored OK” message to not corrupt your blockchain data.

 

Step 6: First start of your AEON Wallet

For this part we will use screen to open several commandlines at the same time. Of course you can use any other tool that allows the same functionality.

screen -S aeond

The screen will clear and you are back in the root folder. We need to go back to the “aeon” main folder.

Depending on where you installed the aeon main folder, you have to adjust the path in the command:
cd aeon

Start now your aeond.

sudo ./aeond

Sit back and wait for the blockchain to be loaded. It takes some time since it will load around 8GB into your RAM. After the loading has been done, it will start to synchronize with the AEON network to be up to date again.

Once the messages “You are now synchronized with the network. You may now start simplewallet.” and “SYNCHRONIZED OK” appear, you are good to go to start simplewallet.

Switch the screen session by pressing CTRL+A then D.
You will see something like:

Your aeond session will continue to run in the background. We will open now a new screen session to start simplewallet.

screen -S simplewallet

The screen will clear and you are back in the root folder. We need to go back to the “aeon” main folder.

Depending on where you installed the aeon main folder, you have to adjust the path in the command:
cd aeon

To use your simplewallet use following command to start simplewallet:

sudo ./simplewallet

 

You just setup your own AEON Wallet. Congratulation and welcome to the world of AEON:)

For intructions on how to use the AEON wallet, click here.